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Man arrested for importing LSD-like drugs in DVD

22 May 2013

Man arrested for importing LSD-like drugs in DVD

A Taupō man has been arrested by Customs officers for importing the drug 25B-NBOMe, an LSD mimic, hidden inside a DVD case.

Five Customs officers, with the assistance of Taupō Police, were part of an operation, which resulted in yesterday’s arrest of the 23-year-old unemployed local.

2,025 tabs of the hallucinogenic drug were intercepted in a mail package destined for the man’s Taupō address.

The man, who was on bail for previous unrelated offending, will appear in the Rotorua District Court today (22 May) on charges relating to the importation of class C drugs.

Further charges in relation to the importation of controlled drugs are pending.

Acting Group Manager Investigations and Response, Shane Panettiere says Customs is pleased these illicit substances have not made it into our communities.

“People should be aware of the dangers posed to themselves and others when they consume these types of substances.

“The analogue drug 25B-NBOMe is often marketed as LSD because of similar effects such as hallucinations, when you couple this with further effects of confusion and paranoia, the results can be fatal,” says Mr Panettiere.

Last year, an Australian man was reported to have died from injuries sustained from behaviour caused by an overdose of this LSD mimic.

Police Senior Sergeant, Harry Harvey says the Police are pleased with the result of this operation.

“It’s always good to see the results of the combined efforts of both agencies and we appreciate the collaborative work with our partners at Customs.”

“Taupō may seem a long way from the border but Customs are on the look out here too,” says Senior Sergeant Harvey.

The maximum sentence that can be imposed by the Courts for importation of a class C controlled drug is seven years’ imprisonment.

If you have information about drug cultivation, manufacture, or supply rings please contact your local Police station. Alternatively information can be provided anonymously via Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.

The New Zealand Customs Service is the government organisation that protects the community from potential risks arising from international trade and travel, while facilitating the legitimate movement of people and goods across the border. Established in 1840, it is New Zealand’s oldest government agency.

As New Zealand's gatekeepers our role includes intercepting contraband (such as illegal drugs); checking travellers and their baggage cargo and mail; protecting businesses against illegal trade; and assessing and collecting Customs duties, excise, and goods and services tax on imports. We use intelligence and risk assessment to target physical checks of containers, vessels or travellers. As a law enforcement agency we conduct investigations and audits, and prosecute offenders.

Customs works closely with other border agencies, in particular the Ministry for Primary Industries and Immigration New Zealand.

More information about Customs can be found on our website: www.customs.govt.nz

ENDS

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