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Triangle Brings Space To Earth

September 2, 2002

Triangle brings NASA's space research down to earth - It's a 'must watch'

Triangle Television is bringing the amazing world of advanced space research and technology to lounges and classrooms with the NASA Destination Tomorrow Television Series.

The half-hourly shows are a learning resource that take an in-depth look at NASA's work and relate it to everyday maths, science and technology. Inspirational and interactive, the series is presented with the sort of youthful effervescence that every educational programme should exude. It's a 'must-watch' series for children, teachers and parents, and will also draw a regular following from those among us with a fascination for space exploration.

Produced by NASA's Centre for Distance Learning and filmed at NASA's Langley Research Centre in Virginia, the series demonstrates to teachers, parents and children how the maths, science and technology they learn in the classroom have everyday applications.

Each show takes an in-depth look at a specific area of space research. For example, one programme focuses on NASA's aircraft crash testing programme, another uses NASA research to discuss how the sun works and takes viewers on a tour around NASA's laboratories.

After watching the programme, children can carry out small-scale versions of some of the highly sophisticated experiments that have enabled man to travel into outer space. For example, one of the programmes features a piece on NASA research being carried out on tyre friction and encourages youngsters to set up similar, small-scale research using a miniature, home-made dragster which is propelled along a cardboard runway with the use of water and effervescent tablets.

And, just when you least expect it, a delightful animated character pops up on screen to direct viewers to specific pages on NASA's website for more in-depth information on particular subjects.

The series, hosted by vibrant and enthusiastic young presenters, is aimed at children aged from about seven to 17 but also has wide appeal for adults. This is truly educational television for young minds at its best! To watch it, tune into Triangle Television at 5pm every Friday. For easy steps on tuning into Triangle, visit www.tritv.co.nz. Triangle Television is Auckland's only regional, non-commercial television station and has operated as a public broadcaster to Greater Auckland since August 1 1998. The channel screens a mix of regional-access television with international news and information programmes. It is non-profit making and operates with no funding from NZ On Air. Triangle broadcasts 24 hours daily from UHF channel 41.

For further information or to arrange an interview with Triangle Chief Executive Officer, Jim Blackman, please call Gail King on 021 412 964


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