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Corruption in sport is just one of many types of fraud

03 November 2016

Corruption in sport is just one of many types of fraud

New Zealand’s first International Fraud Film Festival

New Zealand’s latest film festival tackles a form of fraud that has hit news headlines around the world in recent years – the issue of corruption in sport. The film will be followed by a panel discussion with the sweetheart of NZ sport Valerie Adams, presenter Hayley Holt and Paul David QC who will discuss the effect corruption can have in the sporting arena.

Multi-Olympic medallist and international shot put star Valerie says “I have been directly affected by corruption in sport at the highest and most public level. As a NZ representative with high ethical standards I came out on top in the end and I look forward to discussing with the panel and audience about the motivations behind corruption in sport.”

The documentary to prompt the panel discussion at the Fraud Film Festival is “The Captain and the Bookmaker”, a feature on South African cricket captain Hansie Cronje’s on-field fraud, prompted by bookmakers.

Tickets are available now for the inaugural New Zealand International Fraud Film Festival being held on 18 & 19 November at Auckland’s Q Theatre. The festival, timed to coincide with Fraud Awareness Week, is designed to bring the issue of fraud alive through the medium of film.

Steve Newall, Festival Programme Director says “Having Valerie Adams and Paul David QC on hand to discuss sporting corruption with moderator Hayley Holt bolsters an already interesting selection of documentaries playing during the Fraud Film Festival. The same can be said of our other panellists who will inspire some fascinating conversations, including the co-director of a home-grown hit recently submitted for official Academy Award consideration.”



To demonstrate the far-reaching impacts of fraud and the various guises it comes in, the festival is focusing on a variety of topics including investigative journalism and privacy in the form of documentary “Tickled”.

The discovery by journalist and co-director David Farrier of the unusual practice of competitive tickling led to him teaming up with directing partner Dylan Reeve to expose the people behind this strange – and often manipulative – activity. Reeve will join Herald journalist Matt Nippert, Flicks.co.nz Steve Newall and Assistant Commissioner at the office of the Privacy Commissioner Joy Liddicoat to discuss how investigative journalism can uncover truth and expose the guilty – even in the scarcely believable world of competitive tickling.

For information on the full festival programme and ticketing, go to www.fraudfilmfestival.co.nz

ENDS


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