Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Teachers to receive much-needed science training

28 November 2013

Immediate Release

Teachers to receive much-needed science training

Teachers’ pleas for quality professional development in science have been answered through a new partnership between The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology and NZEI Te Riu Roa’s professional development arm.

The announcement comes just as the Government has announced $3 million to support primary school science teachers after scrapping school science advisors when National Standards were introduced four years ago.

NZEI’s Te Kete Aronui Centre of Educational Excellence has forged an agreement with The MacDiarmid Institute to offer practical science training to early childhood and primary teachers.

Almost 60 per cent of teachers don’t feel they have the necessary skills to teach science to a diverse range of Year 4 students, according to a 2012 study by the Ministry of Education. 

NZEI President Judith Nowotarski said the study had found that there were very few opportunities for primary students to engage in hands-on science activities, such as experiments.

“To inspire children to pursue science-based careers, science has to be practical and interesting. This partnership with hands-on scientists will equip teachers to effectively teach science,” she said.

“The Government’s announcement of $3 million in professional development funding confirms the gaping need for investment in this part of the curriculum.”

The MacDiarmid Institute, a Government-funded Centre of Research Excellence, brings together and equips New Zealand’s leading researchers in nanotechnology and materials science. The Institute is committed to engendering a passion for science and innovation across society.  

“Our intention is that through this partnership, primary and early childhood teachers feel supported and connected in their science-based professional development. It is our hope that all teachers will be confident to lead science learning. We can provide active science researchers as a source of inspiration and information,” said The MacDiarmid Institute’s Director, Professor Kate McGrath.

NZEI members have identified science as a priority area for professional learning, and are particularly interested in exploring the Nature of Science strand of the curriculum and building their confidence as teachers of science.

A "Korero with Scientists" series, which provides teachers with an opportunity to engage with scientists who live in their region has already been trialled and was so successful, it is being developed into a full nation-wide trial programme which will roll out from Term 1 2014.

The Centre of Educational Excellence is a not-for-profit incorporated society, established in 2012 to offer learning and development opportunities for teachers that may not be available elsewhere. It is funded by course or other fees to cover the costs of courses and resources.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: From Here And There

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story
by Helene Wong.
This is the fascinating story of Helene Wong, born in 1949 in Taihape to Chinese parents: her mother, born soon after her parents migrated here, and her father, born in China but sent to relatives in Taihape at seven to get an education in English. More>>

Chiku: Hamilton Zoo's Baby Chimpanzee Named

Hamilton Zoo has named its three-month-old baby chimpanzee after a month-long public naming competition through the popular zoo’s website. The name chosen is Chiku, a Swahili name for girls meaning "talker" or "one who chatters". More>>

Game Over: Trans-Tasman Netball League To Discontinue

Netball Australia and Netball New Zealand have confirmed that the existing ANZ Championship format will discontinue after the current 2016 season, with both organisations to form national netball leagues in their respective countries. More>>

NZSO Review: Stephen Hough Is Perfection-Plus

He took risks, and leant into the music when required. But you also felt that every moment of his playing made sense in the wider picture of the piece. Playing alongside him, the NZSO were wonderful as ever, and their guest conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, coaxed from them a slightly darker, edgier sound than I’m used to hearing. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: King Lear At Circa

In order to celebrate it's 40th birthday, it is perhaps fitting that Circa Theatre should pick a production of 'King Lear,' since it's also somewhat fortuitously Shakespeare's 400th anniversary. If some of the more cerebral poetry is lost in Michael Hurst's streamlined, full throttle production, it's more than made up for by plenty of lascivious violence designed to entertain the groundlings. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Tauranga Books Festival

Escape to Tauranga for Queen’s Birthday weekend and an ideas and books-focused festival that includes performance, discussion, story-telling, workshops and an Italian-theme morning tea. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news