Education Policy | Post Primary | Preschool | Primary | Tertiary | Search

 


Teachers to receive much-needed science training

28 November 2013

Immediate Release

Teachers to receive much-needed science training

Teachers’ pleas for quality professional development in science have been answered through a new partnership between The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology and NZEI Te Riu Roa’s professional development arm.

The announcement comes just as the Government has announced $3 million to support primary school science teachers after scrapping school science advisors when National Standards were introduced four years ago.

NZEI’s Te Kete Aronui Centre of Educational Excellence has forged an agreement with The MacDiarmid Institute to offer practical science training to early childhood and primary teachers.

Almost 60 per cent of teachers don’t feel they have the necessary skills to teach science to a diverse range of Year 4 students, according to a 2012 study by the Ministry of Education. 

NZEI President Judith Nowotarski said the study had found that there were very few opportunities for primary students to engage in hands-on science activities, such as experiments.

“To inspire children to pursue science-based careers, science has to be practical and interesting. This partnership with hands-on scientists will equip teachers to effectively teach science,” she said.

“The Government’s announcement of $3 million in professional development funding confirms the gaping need for investment in this part of the curriculum.”

The MacDiarmid Institute, a Government-funded Centre of Research Excellence, brings together and equips New Zealand’s leading researchers in nanotechnology and materials science. The Institute is committed to engendering a passion for science and innovation across society.  

“Our intention is that through this partnership, primary and early childhood teachers feel supported and connected in their science-based professional development. It is our hope that all teachers will be confident to lead science learning. We can provide active science researchers as a source of inspiration and information,” said The MacDiarmid Institute’s Director, Professor Kate McGrath.

NZEI members have identified science as a priority area for professional learning, and are particularly interested in exploring the Nature of Science strand of the curriculum and building their confidence as teachers of science.

A "Korero with Scientists" series, which provides teachers with an opportunity to engage with scientists who live in their region has already been trialled and was so successful, it is being developed into a full nation-wide trial programme which will roll out from Term 1 2014.

The Centre of Educational Excellence is a not-for-profit incorporated society, established in 2012 to offer learning and development opportunities for teachers that may not be available elsewhere. It is funded by course or other fees to cover the costs of courses and resources.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Education
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news