News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 

MAF Goes Beyond The Call In Testing For BSE in NZ

4 December 2001

MAF goes beyond the call in testing for BSE in New Zealand

An on-going review of the systems in place to continue to protect bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)-free New Zealand from the disease has highlighted that we have much to gain from an enhanced testing programme due to start this month, MAF’s Food Assurance Authority Director Andrew McKenzie said today.

“New Zealand is internationally recognised as BSE-free. Our existing systems meet international requirements. However, in partnership with the industry, we want to go beyond this in order to protect New Zealand.”

A group comprising industry representatives and MAF is regularly reviewing the systems New Zealand has in place to protect against the introduction of BSE, and to prevent the disease spreading in the unlikely event that it enters New Zealand.

“MAF is currently confident that it has in place good systems to protect against the introduction of BSE. All possible entry points have been closed for many years and New Zealand has strong controls at the border.

“However, the regular review identified that, as a country with so much riding on our reputation for producing safe food, boosting our levels of testing to provide additional surveillance and information would enhance our ability to respond to concerns both now and in the future. This also reflects modern scientific developments and the latest experiences from countries that have had to deal with BSE.

“MAF, working in partnership with the meat and farming industries, now aims to increase the level of testing that has been in place in New Zealand since 1989. The number of cattle brains tested for the disease will be increased and is aimed at strengthening the confidence of New Zealand consumers and trading partners. This will also increase our chances of detecting the disease early in the unlikely event that it should ever find its way into New Zealand.

“We are working in a new area of science with many unknown factors and we have to be prepared to deal with any situations that may arise. New Zealand has one of the strongest cases for claiming BSE freedom and we are confident that the pro-active partnership approach we are taking is in the best interests of New Zealand consumers and our vital meat industry,” Mr McKenzie said.

BSE has wrought havoc for farmers in countries where it has been found and variant Creutzfeld Jakob disease (vCJD), the human disease associated with BSE, has caused more than 115 deaths in the United Kingdom. No cases of vCJD have been diagnosed outside Europe.

“New Zealand is fortunate not to have BSE and MAF is determined to ensure that our consumers and cattle population continue to be protected from this disease. Our economy also has a big stake in our safe trade in meat and meat products,” says Mr McKenzie.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

2021: NZ To Host Women’s Rugby World Cup

New Zealand’s successful bid to host the 2021 Women’s Rugby World Cup will raise the profile of the game locally and provide a valuable economic boost for the game, Minister for Sport and Recreation Grant Robertson says. More>>

ALSO:

Max Rashbrooke Review: Mahler 7 - NZSO

Gustav Mahler’s Seventh Symphony may be one of the least well-known of its ilk, but Edo de Waart and the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra made a compelling case for a reassessment. They showed us a work of immense variety, surprising contrast and delicate shades of light and dark. More>>

Howard Davis Review: Strange Overtones - David Byrne's American Utopia Tour

Scotch-born singer-songwriter David Byrne starts each show on his latest world tour stroking a pink brain as he sits alone at a table in a gray three-button Kenzo suit singing a song called Here from his latest album American Utopia. More>>

Governor-General's Speech: Armistice Day 100 Years On

The response was more muted amongst our soldiers at the Front. Many received the news quietly... There was no cheering. The chaps didn’t get excited. It was just a matter of relief. We didn’t celebrate at all. More>>

ALSO:

Auckland Fringe Programme: A Celebration Of The Bizarre And Beautiful

Building on a huge 2018 programme that saw 492 creatives take 81 events for ventures around the city for a total of 347 performances, Auckland Fringe returns this summer, running February 19 – March 3, 2019. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland