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Notifiable Disease Statistics – July 2004

Media Statement

Monday 16 August 2004

Notifiable Disease Statistics – July 2004

Please attribute the following statement to Public Health Unit Clinical Director Dr Virginia McLaughlin.

Disease 2000
(total) 2001
(total) 2002
(total) 2003
(total) 2004
Year to date 2004
July total
Campylobacter 33 34 35 60 49 6
Cryptosporidiosis 3 9 0 1 2 0
Giardiasis 12 5 6 6 10 2
Hepatitis A 0 0 0 0 1 0
Hepatitis B 3 0 2 2 1 0
Hepatitis C 0 1 0 1 3 0
Lead Absorption 1 0 4 1 1 0
Legionellosis 0 0 0 0 1 0
Leptospirosis 1 4 3 1 3 0
Meningococcal Disease 3 6 3 2 6 1
Pertussis 8 1 1 0 15 3
Rheumatic Fever - initial attack 1 1 2 2 4 0
Salmonellosis 6 4 26 9 1 0
Tuberculosis disease-New case 0 1 0 0 1 0
VTEC/STEC Infection 0 0 0 0 1 0
Yersiniosis 1 6 2 7 4 2

Pertussis (whooping cough) – cases of pertussis continued to be notified during July. It is important for parents to ensure that their children’s vaccinations are up to date.

Gastroenteric diseases (tummy bugs) – a number of cases of campylobacter, giardiasis and yersiniosis were notified during July. To prevent catching these infections, the following general advice is provided:

1. Wash your hands thoroughly by using plenty of soap, cleaning under fingernails, rinsing hands well and drying on a clean towel. It is important to wash your hands:

- Before and after preparing food (especially raw meat)
- After going to the toilet or changing a baby’s nappy
- After caring for someone suffering from a tummy bug
- After playing or working with animals

2. Make sure your drinking water is treated

3. Wash all vegetables before eating

4. Making sure that meat is thoroughly cooked before eating

Meningococcal disease – one case was notified in July.

Influenza Surveillance (Data up until 1 August 2004) in New Zealand
Influenza surveillance is conducted on a national basis and runs from May to September each year. There is little influenza activity being reported this year compared to 2002 and 2003. No activity is currently being reported from the Tairawhiti district.

Please note the notifiable disease statistics presented here are provisionally and may be subject to change following laboratory confirmation.

ENDS

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