News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Disturbing health statistics on intellectual disabilities

Commission calls for explanation of progress on disturbing health statistics for New Zealanders with learning/intellectual disabilities

The Human Rights Commission joins the IHC and People First New Zealand in calling for an explanation of progress for people with learning/intellectual disabilities. The call marks the tenth anniversary of the 2003 report of the National Advisory Committee on Health and Disability Issues To Have An Ordinary Life Kia Whai Oranga Noa.

The Committee reported a disturbing level of systemic neglect of the development potential of this group of people and their families. They said there was inadequate and improper health care provision and that people in authority had a disturbing low level of understanding of the impact of their actions and decisions on the lives of adults with an intellectual disability.

Disability Rights Commissioner Paul Gibson said “The health situation for this vulnerable group of New Zealanders has been known for the last 10 years. It is unacceptable that in New Zealand today someone born with a learning/intellectual disability can expect to live twenty years less when this could be preventable”.

In the Government’s report on New Zealand’s human rights performance to the UN Human Rights Council in 2009 it advised there was a workplan in place to address the systemic and serious abuse of the health of people with learning/intellectual disability.

The Ministry of Health’s own 2011 research found people with learning/intellectual disabilities have a life expectancy that is 20 years less than their fellow New Zealanders.

The Commission in its submission on New Zealand’s human rights performance to the UN Human Rights Council in June this year noted there is minimal evidence of a commitment to address this abuse. It called on the Government to advise the steps it has taken to address the systemic abuse of the health of people with learning/intellectual disabilities since 2009.

Successful steps have been taken in other countries to address this issue such as funded annual health checks for adults with learning/intellectual disability.

Commissioner Paul Gibson said “Any lack of progress by the Government towards meeting its own commitments to addressing this issue would be disturbing.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Super Rugby: Parade To Celebrate Highlanders’ Win

The Dunedin City Council is urging people to come along on Monday to congratulate the team on its win in Wellington tonight. The Highlanders will leave from outside the Dental School at midday. More>>

ALSO:

Album Review: Donnie Trumpet And The Social Experiments: Surf

Chance the Rapper is one of my favourite rappers of the last couple years. He bought a uniquely fucked up, acid sound with his debut Acid Rap which has demonstrably influenced others including ILoveMakonnen and A$AP Rocky. It’s remarkable that, at such a ... More>>

Photos: Inside The Christchurch Arts Centre Rebuild

Lady Pippa Blake visited Christchurch Arts Centre chief executive André Lovatt, a 2015 recipient of the Blake Leader Awards. The award celebrated Lovatt’s leadership in New Zealand and hisand dedication to the restoration of the Arts Centre. More>>

Running Them Up The Flagpole: Web Tool Lets Public Determine New Zealand Flag

A School of Design master’s student is challenging the flag selection process by devising a web tool that allows the public to feed their views back in a way, he says, the current government process does not. More>>

ALSO:

Survey: ‘The Arts Make My Life Better’: New Zealanders

New Zealanders are creative people who believe being involved in the arts makes their lives better and their communities stronger. Nine out of ten adult New Zealanders (88%) agree the arts are good for them and eight out of ten (82%) agree that the arts help to improve New Zealand society. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Reprieve For Te Papa Press

Following its review of the role of Te Papa Press, Te Papa has committed to continue publishing books during the museum’s redevelopment, Chief Executive Rick Ellis announced yesterday. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news