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Thrash sensation Alien Weaponry to headline Fringe Town

The young kiwi band taking the world by storm with thrash-inflected, Māori infused groove-metal has been confirmed to play for one night only, Saturday 29 February at the Auckland Town Hall. Alien Weaponry headlines Fringe Town’s eclectic programme of extraordinary performers at the Auckland Town Hall, as part of Auckland Fringe.

The Northland trio, barely out of their teens, are “one of the most exciting young metal bands in the world right now” according to Revolver Magazine. Since they released their third single Rū Ana te Whenua in mid-2017, fans, bloggers, the music industry and media alike have raved about Alien Weaponry’s unique blend of thrash metal, with many of their songs performed in te reo Māori.

“Māori haka is a lot like metal,” says Alien Weaponry drummer Henry de Jong. “In fact, more so than reggae or hip-hop, which are often the ‘go-to’ genres for Māori music here in New Zealand. Metal and Māori just works. It kicks ass!” (louderthansound.com)

Brothers Henry de Jong (age 19, drums) and Lewis de Jong (age 17, guitars, vocals) are proud descendants of Ngati Pikiāo and Ngati Raukawa, and along with Ethan Trembath (age 17, bass) the band has been on a meteoric rise following their 2016 Smokefree Rock Quest win. Other wins include Smokefree Pacifica Beats and the Auckland Live Best Independent Debut, as part of the Taite Music Prize 2019. Their debut album has been acclaimed worldwide, amassing over a million streams on Spotify in its first week of release, and was included in many “top albums of 2018” lists.

Despite their youth, Alien Weaponry already have the best part of a decade’s experience behind them since they formed the band in 2010. They toured Europe and North America for the first time in the latter half of 2018, performing as a support act for Ministry on their American tour. The band realised their dream of performing at the famous Wacken metal festival in Germany before Henry turns 20.

Early musical influences include Metallica, Anthrax, Rage Against the Machine and Red Hot Chilli Peppers; and current favourites include Lamb of God, System of a Down, Gojira and Trivium. The de Jong brothers wrote their first song together at 8 and 10 years old; and the band’s name was also decided then – inspired by the movie District 9.

Don’t miss this exciting opportunity to experience the fresh, raw and energetic sound of the kiwi band taking te reo Māori trash metal to the world stage.

Alien Weaponry will perform at the Great Hall, Auckland Town Hall as part of Fringe Town.

The inaugural Fringe Town was headlined by iconic Russian punk provocateurs, Pussy Riot, earlier this year. The 2020 line-up of contemporary dance, theatre and music will run from 25 - 29 February with the full line-up to be announced Monday 13 January. Watch this space!

Alien Weaponry plays
Sat 29 Feb at 8.30pm (Doors open at 7pm)
Great Hall, Auckland Town Hall
Price: Adult $35, Groups of 6+ $25, Students & Fringe Artists $20.
*Service fees and terms and conditions apply.

Auckland Live presale starts today
General Public tickets onsale Monday 2 December, 9am
Book at Ticketmaster
For more information visit: aucklandlive.co.nz/show/fringe20-alien-weaponry

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