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Endeavour’s departure from Tuia Voyage prompts reflection

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2019

Endeavour’s pending departure from Tuia 250 Voyage prompts reflection


Don’t miss the Tuia 250 Voyage flotilla when it comes to Te Whanganui-a-Tara/ Wellington this weekend. The flotilla will make a spectacular sight as it performs a sail around of Wellington Harbour on Friday afternoon, say the co-chairs of the Tuia 250 National Coordinating Committee, Dame Jenny Shipley and Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr.
“This is the last time the HMB Endeavour replica will be seen with the flotilla, before she returns to Australia,” says Dame Jenny.

The vessels in the flotilla - including the waka Haunui, Ngahiraka Mai Tawhiti and Fa’afaite and the tall ships Endeavour replica and Spirit of New Zealand - are scheduled to arrive in Te Whanganui-a-Tara/Wellington on Friday morning, where they will muster off Matiu/Somes Island, before commencing the sail around of the harbour at around 1pm.

“There will be great views of the flotilla for Wellingtonians from a wide range of vantage points,” says Dame Jenny.

“Te Whanganui-a-Tara/Wellington represents the 13th of 15 legs of the Tuia 250 Voyage, and this weekend offers the last opportunity to see and go aboard the Endeavour replica before she leaves.

“This flotilla of vessles has had an amazing impact on our conversations as Kiwis as we have reflected on our shared voyaging and navigation histories, so don’t miss the chance to visit them while they are in Te Whanganui-a-Tara/Wellington.

“The upcoming departure of the replica Endeavour and her crew definitely gives cause for reflection. The crew has taken part in this Tuia 250 flotilla with dedication to the Tuia kaupapa as a vessel among equals.

“Over the past two months, we have commemorated tragedies and celebrated successes. Most importantly, many New Zealands have been open to what they didnt know and have looked deep into the heart of what Tuia 250 is all about.

“Tuia is about creating a respectful space that enables us to have a kōrero about our dual heritage, the encounters good and bad and our shared future we are building together.

“There are many unheard stories being told, and a rebalancing of histories taking place that is long overdue. There have been stunning examples that this is bringing Māori and Pākehā closer together while valuing and respecting our differences.”

Hoturoa says that as a sailor and navigator, there is much to admire in all the vessels that are part of the Tuia 250 Voyage.

“Each of these vesssels has it’s own unique capabilities and personality. And while they represent different cultures, places and times, they also have a lot in common.

“They all represent a great spirit of adventure. When you leave the safety of the shore behind and head out onto the ocean, this takes daring and fortitude, no matter what type of vessel you’re on.

“I think Tuia 250 is helping Kiwis see that both Māori and Pākehā have great navigational and seafaring capabilities and traditions. We can appreciate both the differences and similarities of those, just as we can appreciate what defines and also what binds our cultures together as New Zealanders.

“I hope as many Wellingtonians as possible can visit the flotilla at Queens Wharf this weekend.
“Seeing the vessels up close provides a very tangible experience of our histories. It’s been fantastic observing the emotional reactions that children and adults are having to the vessels during the Tuia 250 Voyage. We urge you to take this opportunity to experience it for yourselves.”

After this weekend’s events in Te Whanganui-a-Tara/Wellington, the Tuia 250 Voyage flotilla will head south to Whakaraupō/Lyttelton.

The following week, the waka will sail north to Te Mahia – between Tūranganui-a-Kiwa/Gisborne and Napier – for the Tuia 250 Voyage closing ceremony.

ends

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