Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

Local Playwright’s Award-Nominated Work To Debut In Hamilton

Award shortlisted debut play by local writer Melanie Allison, My Incredibly Important Life is premiering at The Meteor Theatre this April. Nominated in 2020 for Playmarket’s Playwrights b4 25 award, the plays debut season will run at Hamilton’s Meteor Theatre April 28 - May 1st with 7pm performances. Brought to life by a talented cast of local performers the play will see, Hannah-Rose Cook, Jenny Parham, and Jared Wooldridge take the stage.


Hannah-Rose Cook and Jenny Parham in rehearsal

My Incredibly Important Life follows Amelia, played by Hannah-Rose Cook, as she attempts to get her first novel published, while living with her Mother played by Jenny Parham. A play of old hurts and regrets, lingering ghosts, and possible legacies, My Incredibly Important Life offers a unique look at the relationship between a Mother and Daughter. Described by Playmarket judges as “gentle, delicate, compelling and skilfully structured”. The play marks a continued trend of locally produced theatre that is increasingly high-quality while tackling relevant, everyday issues.

“I wrote My Incredibly Important Life when I felt like I was the only person who didn’t have a conventional mother-daughter bond,” says playwright Melanie Allison. “I hope that by seeing this play, anyone who has had a similar experience will know that they are not alone in that struggle.”

Allison is currently studying her Master’s in Professional Writing at the University of Waikato. My Incredibly Important Life is her first play to debut in Hamilton, but she has previously been published in Mayhem Literary Journal and has appeared on stage in numerous local theatre productions.

There’s more than just quality writing to be enjoyed on this night at the theatre. The production team including experienced Hamilton-based theatre makers Caroline Waugh and Andrew T. Lyall are creating unique soundscapes to accompany the play, while also cultivating set and lighting. The ensemble are also training with director Andrew T. Lyall to bring charismatic and grounded performances into the sometimes mundane, often surreal story of My Incredibly Important Life.

Ticket bookings are now open for the strictly limited four-show-season. Booking in advance is essential due to half-capacity seating for an intimate performance in The Meteor’s Black Box theatre. Individual concessions and group discounts are available, alongside a very special discounted double ticket for Mothers and Daughters.

Find out more and book your tickets now at www.themeteor.co.nz.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 


Howard Davis: Emerald Fennell's Promising Young Woman'


The Guardian needed not one, but three reviews to do justice to Fennell's unsettling approach, which indicates exactly how ambiguous and controversial its message really is. More>>


Howard Davis: Jill Trevelyan's Rita Angus

Although Angus has become one of Aotearoa’s best-loved painters, the story of her life remained little known and poorly understood before Jill Trevelyan's acclaimed and revelatory biography, which won the Non Fiction Award at the Montana New Zealand Book Awards in 2009, and has now been republished by Te Papa press. More>>

Howard Davis: The Back of the Painting

Painting conservators are the forensic pathologists of the art world. While they cannot bring their subjects back to life, they do provide fascinating insights into the precise circumstances of a painting's creation, its material authenticity, and constructive methodology. More>>


Howard Davis: Black Panthers on the Prowl

A passionate and gripping political drama from Shaka King, this is an informative and instructive tale of human frailty that centers around the charismatic Chicago Black Panther leader Fred Hampton, who was murdered at the age of twenty-one during a police raid. More>>

Howard Davis: Controlling the High Ground

Stephen Johnson's raw and angry film not only poses important questions with scrupulous authenticity, but also provides a timely reminder of the genocidal consequences of casual bigotry and xenophobia. More>>

Howard Davis: Dryzabone - Robert Conolly's The Dry

After the terrible devastation caused by last year’s bushfires, which prompted hundreds of Australians to shelter in the ocean to escape incineration and destroyed uncountable amounts of wildlife, The Dry has been released during a totally different kind of dry spell. More>>


Howard Davis: Hit the Road, Jack - Chloé Zhao's Nomadland

Nomadland is perhaps the ultimately 'road' movie as it follows a group of dispossessed and disenfranchised vagabonds who find a form of communal refuge in camp sites and trailer parks after the economic contraction of 2008. More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 
 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland