Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


100% Pure NZ Tag Hurts Our Economy

100% Pure NZ Tag Hurts Our Economy


Marketing Advisor Daniel Batten says 100% Pure NZ tag damaging our economy.

Imagine if Nike’s tagline was “we care for the world’s feet”. It would damage its brand. Why? Because it would invite scrutiny about whether this statement was true, if the feet in question belonged to someone in one of their factories in the developing world.

In the same way, our 100% Pure NZ tagline now damages our international reputation. It does still have a place: on the left hand side of a Tui’s billboard.

The only positive in the erosion of this brand is that it is forcing us to get real, and realize the huge economic cost of giving not enough importance to our environment.

In the past, whether you were a company or a country: you could hide a lot of information about what went on underneath the brand and rely on spin to carry the day. In a social media rich post-Internet age, this strategy falls over because, if you don’t live in China, it’s too easy to get the real information.

Today, for marketing to have currency with the market it must be adhere to the 3 C’s: clear, compelling and correct. Most companies in NZ are correct, but neither clear nor compelling. When too much old-style PR/marketing gets involved, a message becomes clear and compelling, but not correct. “100% Pure NZ” is an example of the latter.

Deborah Grey from Tourism NZ defends the 100% Pure slogan because “the landscape, people and activities is 100% unique to us”. Based on that argument, the Fukushima Nuclear Reactor and its people is 100% pure. Her argument has a name: “spin”. But spin is no longer a strategy that enhances a brand. You may remember a similar case of such spin when ASB Bank claimed to be “A kiwi bank” because it invested in the kiwi community and hired lots of kiwis. The message failed the “correct” criteria. People objected. The campaign was quickly pulled.

Until recently we could still use the 100% pure banner, because we said we had a commitment to clean up our act. The straw that broke that camel’s back was when the NZ Govt’s recently withdrew from making Doha Climate Change commitment. This action announced to the world “not only is our own backyard not pure, but we’re also cool with messing up the global backyard in the process”.

Successive NZ Govts have discovered the hard way that the days where a brand could bare no resemblance to values and actions are gone.

The good news is that we may yet compete again. It won’t be easy and it starts with stopping the BS and getting real. Kind of like the strategy of a certain cyclist who tainted his 100% pure brand. New Zealand’s solution follows a similar logic too.

1. Confess: “Sorry I lied – we are not clean and pure”
2. Find another brand that is clear, compelling and correct, while we set about doing what any good software company would do in this situation: fix the bugs. The bugs that soiled our pure image in the first place. Fix our waterways, reduce per capita greenhouse omissions and stop cyanide poisoning our bush and end deep sea drilling contracts off our not so 100% pure coastline is a good start.
3. Beg for forgiveness, acknowledge that pulling out of Doha showed flawed judgment, and show contrition.

If we start now this will take around 8 years. Then we may yet be able to compete under the 100% Pure NZ brand again. It’s not ideal. But alternative is far worse.

---------------

Daniel Batten is a consultant on authentic messaging and marketing. He is former-CEO of Biomatters, and is the principal of the consulting firm Beyond The Ceiling.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Sky City : Auckland Convention Centre Cost Jumps By A Fifth

SkyCity Entertainment Group, the casino and hotel operator, is in talks with the government on how to fund the increased cost of as much as $130 million to build an international convention centre in downtown Auckland, with further gambling concessions ruled out. The Auckland-based company has increased its estimate to build the centre to between $470 million and $530 million as the construction boom across the country drives up building costs and design changes add to the bill.
More>>

ALSO:

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news