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Rare treat for Christchurch music lovers

Rare treat for Christchurch music lovers

To mark the 100th anniversary year of Poland’s regained independence, visiting professor, music educator and Steinway Artist Raphael Lustchevsky will delight Christchurch music lovers with a piano recital.

The programme will include compositions that were played in Christchurch by another Polish pianist 114 years ago – a man who was destined to become the first Prime Minister of the fledging Polish republic, Ignacy Jan Paderewski. In 1904 when Paderewski first visited New Zealand he was considered the world’s foremost pianist.

This is also a return to Christchurch for Raphael Lustchevsky who played at the newly opened Great Hall in the Arts Centre almost two years ago.

This year, his concert programme will include the works of Poland’s best known and most loved composer Frederic Chopin, and by Ignacy Jan Paderewski himself. Highlights also include Liszt’s Hungarian Rhapsody No.2 (which was performed by Paderewski in his glorious 1904 concert tour of New Zealand), and Rhapsody in Blue by George Gershwin, rarely performed in its original, acrobatically virtuoso piano-solo version.

Lustchevsky debuted at the age of 16 with the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra and has been included on the prestigious list of Steinway Artists since 2001.

New Zealand has a long tradition of welcoming Poles to its shores. From 1795 and for the next over 100 years until 1918, Poland found herself divided among Austria, Prussia, and Russia, and deprived of independent statehood. Poles were subject to a series of measures aimed against them, against their language and their culture, which were replaced by incremental enforcement of the language and culture of the controlling states. This led to a large wave of emigration from Poland in search of freedom and a better life. A small number of Polish Jews started arriving in New Zealand in the 1850s and 60s, followed by a larger group of migrants from the Prussian zone arriving from 1872 onwards.

ENDS

Raphael Lustchevsky’s “Heart of Europe” piano recital is on Saturday, 28 April 2018,
7-9 pm at The Piano, Armagh Street. Tickets are available from Eventfinda:
https://www.eventfinda.co.nz/2018/heart-of-europe-raphael-lustchevsky-piano-recital/christchurch

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