News Video | Policy | GPs | Hospitals | Medical | Mental Health | Welfare | Search

 


Calling on women to break taboos around periods and vaginas

Calling on women to break taboos around periods and vaginas

Are we a nation of prudes when it comes to periods?

Menstruation is still considered the ‘unmentionable’, with new research showing that women are more comfortable to talk about their sex lives than their periods. In fact, Australian women shockingly view other females who talk about their periods as vulgar (26%), crude (29%), embarrassing (41%) – and even weird (26%), according to research from CAREFREE®.

So why is it that, in the modern era, something that billions of women experience every month is still so taboo, and what implications does this shy behaviour have for our girls?

General Practitioner, Dr Farah Kroman*, who moderates a social forum on vaginal health, sponsored by CAREFREE®, believes it’s critical to address the sensitivities surrounding vaginal health and encourage women to stop talking about periods in a ‘hush hush’ fashion, like some sort of secret women’s business.

“Every day we receive questions through the CAREFREE® website from young women asking basic questions about their periods and vaginal health. The anonymous forum gives them courage to ask the questions that, for whatever reason, are not being answered within their inner circles. If women are not confident, or feel ashamed, to talk about such issues with friends, parents, or their own doctor – how can we expect our girls to understand what’s normal and healthy, in order to care for their bodies?” Dr Farah said.

Dr Kroman’s remarks come as CAREFREE® embarks on its Be Real campaign, which looks to tackle the taboos of periods and vaginal health head on by demonstrating the reality – and normality – of periods. The very brand that shocked the nation in 2012 by daring to use real words for real body parts in its ads, is returning to TV to advance its mission of liberating girls from vagina-related anxieties. The new ads intend to show women they are not alone, and that our experiences as females – good, bad or ugly – are indeed what unite us.

The Be Real television commercial features scenarios of women experiencing everything from anxiety over how to insert a tampon, to being caught out while getting a little too amorous. The Be Real television commercial will be broadcast from Sunday 2 March and can be viewed at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2GPIrfS7elo.

As part of the campaign, CAREFREE® is calling on women to share their stories to help normalise conversations around periods, and encourage more women to be open, honest and real about periods.

“We need to break these taboos to normalise the conversation around periods and provide women with the comfort that they are not alone in their experiences,” says a spokesperson from the brand. “We want to encourage women to feel more open and comfortable in discussing their personal health, and in turn, feel more confident in managing their period.”

Women are invited to share their stories at mycarefree.co.nz, and enjoy reading more stories, perhaps enjoy a laugh and also seek support on the site.

* Dr Farah Kroman has been paid by CAREFREE® to provide independent professional advice to women who submit questions about personal health and wellbeing through the mycarefree.co.nz website.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: No Longer An Island

Simon Nathan reviews 'Zealandia: Our Continent Revealed': The idea that New Zealand is part of a large submerged continent is not new... There was renewed interest in the extent of offshore New Zealand from the 1970s onwards with the start of offshore drilling for oil and gas, and this was given impetus by a UN agreement which allowed countries to claim an Extended Continental Shelf (ECS). More>>

Art: Simon Denny Recreates Kim Dotcom’s Personal Effects

Who owns what? How has the internet changed our relation to the world? These are two of the many questions Simon Denny raises in the latest exhibition at the Adam Art Gallery, opening on Saturday 4 October. More>>

Theatre: The F Word: Sex Without The 'ism'

Sex without the 'ism' Okay, so the sexes are equal in the eyes of the law. What the F happens now? More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Don’t Eat The Fish

On 'The Catch' by Michael Field What the ecologically edible lists don’t appear to take into account – and they should – is slavery... It’s not an easy read, but it’s definitely near the top of my listicle of “5 Political Books You Must Read This Year”. More>>

ALSO:

Caracals: Small Cats With Big Ears Arrive At Wellington Zoo

Visitors to Wellington Zoo will be able to see New Zealand’s first Caracals in the Zoo’s new Grassland Cats habitat, with a special visitor opening day on Saturday 27 September. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: Classics - Tales From Moominvalley
Can’t speak for the reading end of it but the Moomins ( or maybe the story about Margaret Wise Brown) were the most enjoyable subject to think about and write about during these whole first 50 issues of Werewolf. For that reason – and because the Moomins always reward re-reading – I’ve decided to reprint it. The only added element is a link to an interesting hour long documentary about Tove Jansson. More>>

ALSO:

Repping In The Pacific: All Blacks And Manu Samoa To Play Historic Apia Test

The All Blacks will play Manu Samoa in Apia on Wednesday 8 July next year as part of both teams’ preparations for Rugby World Cup 2015. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Health
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news