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Let’s talk more

Let’s talk more


Men’s Health Trust New Zealand is encouraging men to talk more with their friends and loved ones about health. This is the core of their new brand, launched recently at their annual golf fundraiser event at Remuera Golf Club, sponsored by Parker Hannifin.

“During our research, we found that men struggle to overcome their fear or hesitancy to take more responsibility about personal and proative healthcare. The reasons are varied but fundamentally, men don’t place enough importance on it and therefore ignore it until something traumatic occurs” says Dr Graeme Washer, trustee and medical director for the Trust.

Men’s Health Trust has been in existence for almost 8 years which was founded by Colleen Thurston when she became frustrated with the lack of information about men’s health when her husband Graham became ill. Last year, Colleen retired as Chairman and Phil Clemas, a trustee for 3 years at the time was voted as the new Chair. “Colleen’s legacy is that we have a charity organisation which has invested in 31 tertiary scholarships focused on men entering the health care sector, invested in disease research and developed corporate health programmes and events to inspire change. The next challenge is to develop a plan that can step up from Colleen’s vision and ultimately help many more men overcome their complacency” says Phil Clemas.

The first step was to review the existing brand to ensure it still represented the essence and main purpose for the charity’s existence. “Changing men’s behaviour is a huge task but one that doesn’t daunt us. But as a small charity, we need to ensure relevance and become very focused on delivering projects that give us the biggest bang for our donated dollar.” States Phil Clemas. “It quickly became clear that we were moving into green fields and a new brand statement and identity was needed to communicate who we are and where we’re going”.

Simplicity is the benchmark. “After working closely with Phil and the other trustees, we quickly came to the realisation that men generally need help and guidance to ‘overcome’ their fear or reluctance to be more informed and interested about their health” says M&C Saatchi’s Joint CEO, Tony Burt. “Talking a little more about matters around family, aspirations, interests, health, might just help more men realise the importance of getting healthy and staying healthy”.

This is why the Men’s Health Trust, with help from creative agency M&C Saatchi decided to design a brand identity that represents the importance of conversation with friends and loved ones. When men open up a little and talk about that niggling skin irritation, the breathlessness or a recurring headache, more will be persuaded by those closest to do something about it. And maybe even encourage them to take their health a little more seriously.

This brand evaluation has helped the trust focus on new initiatives that will continue to help men’s health. Men’s Health Week starts on June 9th and the trust will recognise this important period with a breakfast event that will feature two special guest speakers, happy to share their inspiring stories with the 400 guests expected. If interested, call the trust on (09) 973 4761.

Ends

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