Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Everyday Fiction: Artists imagine the world at The Dowse

For immediate release: 14 January 2014

Everyday Fiction: Artists imagine the world this February at The Dowse Art Museum

What would you pack in an apocalypse toolkit? How would the heroes of Greek mythology fare in colonial New Zealand? A new exhibition at The Dowse brings together ten New Zealand artists' speculations on history, memory, and how we might live: right now, back then, and in the future.

Curated by 2013 Blumhardt Curatorial Intern Emma Ng, Everyday Fiction includes works of design, decorative art and contemporary art. DIY-style structures sit next to small, beautifully crafted objects, threaded together by an urge to make everyday life more thought-provoking.

Emma says, "I was interested in how we are always dreaming beyond the bounds of our own lives - venturing further and further in search of fresh starts and opportunities to reshape the way we live."

Auckland architect Sara Lee's collages imagine her grandparents' house in colonial Taiwan, and the domestic details that shaped their lives. Artist-designers SWAMP & Tiago Rorke use portable computing technologies to play on that ubiquitous 1990s toy, the tamagotchi. Their version tests our attachment to digital technologies, bringing together a living organism and a virtual pet.

Dunedin artist Bekah Carran welcomes visitors to the space with a contemplative installation inspired by philosophies that embrace simplicity, impermanence and imperfection. How might these philosophies sit amongst the chaos of throw-away culture and natural disasters? At the other end of the gallery Andy Irving & Keila Martin's Apocalypse Tent invites visitors inside to ponder a life of isolation and self-sufficiency, in a land made unfamiliar by some distant apocalypse.

Jeweller Kirsten Haydon explores an unfamiliar land of a different kind, inspired by a visit to Antarctica. Beautiful, icy and mysterious, her work imagines the form Antarctic souvenirs might take, channelling both the landscape and human histories of Antarctica.

New Zealand's own history is reimagined by printmaker Marian Maguire in three striking lithographs. She brings together the imagery and characters of Greek myth, colonial settlers and contemporaneous Maori to suggest new ways of telling the stories of New Zealand's settlement. New Zealand's formative years are also reworked in the intricate textile work of Wellington artist, Jo Torr. Exploring mutual cultural exchanges between Europe and Polynesia, Torr has crafted an exquisite set of 1770s-style European undergarments from tapa cloth, embroidered with New Zealand flora.

Emma Ng is the sixth recipient of the Blumhardt Foundation's Curatorial Internship, funded by Creative NZ. A legacy of New Zealand potter Dame Doreen Blumhardt's commitment to arts education, the internship provides a rare opportunity for an aspiring curator to develop their skills alongside professional museum staff, in a contemporary gallery setting. Emma has been working under the mentorship of Dowse Senior Curator, Emma Bugden.

Everyday Fiction
22 February - 25 May 2014
The Dowse Art Museum | FREE ENTRY
www.dowse.org.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Māori Language Week: He Karanga Kia Kaha Ake Te Tīhau Ki Te Reo Māori

The Māori Language Commission wishes to see social media swamped with Māori language tweets and messages for Te Wiki o te Reo Māori using the hashtag #tekupu. More>>

ALSO:

Book Vote: Kiwis Prefer Young Adult & Classics

To compile their Top 100 List for 2014, Whitcoulls again asked New Zealanders to vote for their favourite books and authors. And while classic novels continue to appeal to Kiwi readers, 2014 marks a significant new trend – the increasing popularity of novels for young adults. More>>

ALSO:

Five NZ Cities: Bill Bailey Back To The Southern Hemisphere

The gap between how we imagine our lives to be and how they really are is the subject of Bill’s new show Limboland. With his trademark intelligence and sharp wit, he tells tales of finding himself in this halfway place. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Book Television Is Coming

Carole Beu of The Women’s Bookshop in Auckland, Graham Beattie of The Book Blog and producer Deb Faith of FaceTV have raised enough money via crowd funding at Boosted – just under $7,000 so far – for 12 episodes, which begin production in September, and will be on screen later that month. More>>

Electric Sheep: Light Nelson Exceeds All Expectations

Light Nelson exceeded all expectations drawing over 40,000 people over two nights to the Queens Gardens and surrounds. The event, with over 40 installations from local and national artists, is in its second year, and organisers were hoping they’d top last year’s crowd of 16,000. More>>

MacGyver: Richard Dean Anderson To Attend Armageddon This October

New Zealand’s biggest pulp-culture event, the Armageddon Expo is proud to announce the world’s most recognised DIY action hero will be attending the Auckland event at the ASB Showgrounds from October 24th to 27th. More>>

ALSO:

Barbershop Gold: Māori Party Singing Praises Of The Musical Island Boys

The Maori Party has congratulated four young men on a mission, who in 2002 took up barbershop singing at Tawa College, and tonight took out the Gold Medal in the 2014 International Barbershop Harmony Society competitions in Las Vegas. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news