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Into the Icy Realms: On Assignment with Paul Nicklen

Into the Icy Realms: On Assignment with Paul Nicklen
Monday 29th July, ASB Theatre, Aotea Centre

Grizzlies, Piranhas, and Man-Eating Pigs: On Assignment with Joel Sartore

Friday 23rd August, Auckland Town Hall

National Geographic Live comes to New Zealand for the first time on the 27th July and 23rd August with epic tales of adventure from the most remote corners of the planet. Discover what it’s like to be on assignment with Nat Geo, as two real life explorers share their most intense and inspiring encounters. Into the Icy Realms sees biologist and photojournalist Paul Nicklen endure the remote and extreme in pursuit of some of the most elusive polar creatures; while intrepid explorer Joel Sartore adventures to some of the world’s most beautiful and challenging environments and lives to tell the tale in Grizzlies, Piranhas and Man-Eating Pigs.

Appealing to all of those inspired by travel, exploration, discovery – and who value the National Geographic Society’s mission to inspire people to care about the planet – Nat Geo Live is for adventurers, thinkers, nature lovers and explorers of all ages.

Says Nat Geo Live producer Sam Sneddon: “This year’s explorers promise to take audiences to the world’s most extreme places, people and animals, using adventure and the highs of that natural world to inspire people to care about the planet. We thank our main series sponsor, Adventure World, National Geographic Channel, Cathay Pacific Airways and Sofitel Auckland Viaduct Harbour for their support.”

Says Adventure World head of national sales and partnerships, Neil Rodgers: “Our support for Nat Geo Live is a natural extension of the Adventure World promise, offering incredible and inspirational experiences to those compelled to explore and discover.”

Into the Icy Realms: On Assignment with Paul Nicklen

Monday 29th July

Paul Nicklen spent his childhood in Canada’s Arctic among the Inuit people. From them he learned a love of nature, the understanding of icy ecosystems, and the survival skills that have helped him become one of the most successful wildlife and nature photographers of our generation.

As a biologist and photojournalist adventuring to the most remote and extreme environments, he faces incredible hardships and danger in pursuit of powerful, intimate and iconic experiences. His inimitable style of storytelling blends the ethereal beauty of the icy realm and the mysteries of some of the most elusive polar creatures—both above and below the surface —with some of the most intense and harsh realities facing these unique and important ecosystems.

Into the Icy Realms sees Nicklen sharing some of his most some unforgettable experiences while photographing on assignment for National Geographic magazine. He reveals his humorous side as he describes the incredible challenges he faces in order to discover and capture the kind of images National Geographic demands of its best photographers. From narwhals, walruses, and bowhead whales in the Arctic to leopard seals and emperor penguins in the Antarctic, Nicklen’s emotional portrayal of his most electrifying, humbling and satisfying wildlife encounters will leave audiences intensely inspired.

Nicklen is a passionate advocate for polar and marine biodiversity. He has published 11 stories for National Geographic and has received more than 20 international awards including 2010’s Nature: First Prize Story award from World Press Photo. A YouTube video of his close encounter with a female sea leopard in Antarctica has been seen by over 4.8 million people, where he spent four days trying to feed him penguins through the “mouth” of his camera lens.

Grizzlies, Piranhas, and Man-Eating Pigs: On Assignment with Joel Sartore

Friday 23rd August

An intrepid explorer and daring photographer, Joel Sartore’s assignments have seen him adventure to some of the world’s most beautiful and challenging environments. From the heat of the Amazon to the brutal chills of the Arctic and across every single continent.

Sartore has learned the hard way that there’s a lot more to it than just capturing amazing places and cultures - there’s also a chance things can go terribly wrong, and they often do. In Grizzlies, Piranhas and Man-Eating Pigs Sartore shares an intimate and humorous look at what could be the best—and worst—job in the world as he plays expedition leader, psychologist, medic, and coach, as well as photographer. It’s just another day in the office when you’re on assignment with Nat Geo.

His first National Geographic assignments introduced him to nature photography and allowed his to see human impact on the environment first-hand. Sartore’s next mission is to document endangered species and landscapes in order to show a world worth saving. In his words, “It is folly to think that we can destroy one species and ecosystem after another and not affect humanity. When we save species, we’re actually saving ourselves.” He has since been chased by a wide variety of species including wolves, grizzlies, must oxen, lions, elephants and polar bears.

An event not to be missed for adventurers of all ages, experience life in the most remote corners of our planet - on assignment with National Geographic.

DETAILS:

Tickets from $39*. Tickets on sale from 8th May 2013.

ends

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