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Pay Increase Will Deepen Crisis in Elderly Care

17 December 2004

Nurses Pay Increase Will Deepen Crisis in Elderly Care

Residential Care NZ welcomes the pay increase for Nurses but warns that it will further deepen the crisis in elderly care.

“Its great news, Nurses deserve to be paid more and they have waited a long time to get a decent wage” said Martin Taylor CEO of Residential Care NZ.

“However, the Labour government is only funding a wage increase for Nurses in DHB hospitals. The consequence of this short sighted approach will be to create an in-balance between the private and the public sector”, said Martin Taylor CEO of Residential Care NZ.

Residential care facilities, which rely on government funding, also employ Nurses to provide their elderly residents with the best possible care.

“I am surprised, a Government committed to pay parity, that is equal pay for work of equal value could let this happen, it seems Labour believes a Nurse in the private sector is worth less than a Nurse in the public sector”, said Martin Taylor CEO of Residential Care NZ.

“I would like the present Cabinet to explain how rest homes can compete for Nurses with DHBs, when the DHBs have been given hundreds of millions to increase wages by over 20% and whilst rest homes have been offered 1%”, said Martin Taylor CEO of Residential Care NZ.

“The reality is rest home costs have increased dramatically. The Holidays Act has added 2% to costs and inflation another 3%. On top of this a Nurse will soon cost 20-30% more, yet the Labour government has only offered us a 1% funding increase”, said Martin Taylor CEO of Residential Care NZ.

“It’s seems bizarre, but this Labour led government is taking a laissez-faire approach to elderly care regardless of the personal costs to our residents or staff or the rural community”, said Martin Taylor CEO of Residential Care NZ.

ENDS

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