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Look Out For Lower Speed Limits In Tairāwhiti

(Photo-Supplied)

New speed signs are being installed in Stout Street and the central business district (CBD) as part of the Interim Speed Management Plan (ISMP) for this region.

The lower limits have been in response to community needs and safety considerations.

Council Community Lifelines Director Tim Barry says Stout Street has been reduced to 40km/h from the city end to Wi Pere Street.

“We hope this makes a difference to the wellbeing of the residents who have campaigned hard for lower speed limits for a few years. Things can take time to go through the required processes and we’re really happy to be at this point and see the signs go up.”

The ISMP empowers the Council to set speed limits on local roads, with a focus on safety and community well-being.

The CBD’s new 30km speed signs will enhance the safety for pedestrians and cyclists.

Some rural areas will see reduced speeds from 100 km/h to 80, 60, or 50 km/h. These changes apply to locations with recent crash history, new growth, or to better support walking and cycling.

Areas around some schools have been reduced to 30 or 40km/h based on those on roads with the biggest risks.

Speed limits on state highways fall under Waka Kotahi’s jurisdiction.

The ISMP enabled changes to speed limits to be applied before full speed management plans were brought into the ministry of land transport speed setting rule.

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