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More Can be Done to Assist Unemployed

CTU media release
5 November 2009

More Can be Done to Assist Unemployed

The Council of Trade Unions says more can be done to assist the unemployed. The unemployment rate, as measured by the Household Labour Force Survey (HLFS) published today, went up to 6.5 percent in the September quarter which is 150,000 people.

Peter Conway, CTU Secretary, said: “Now would be a good time for the Government to increase funding for skills training for those unemployed seeking a job. The Skills Investment Fund already exists and could do with a top up to make it easier for unemployed workers to get work.”

Conway said that recent unemployment benefit statistics showed a slight dip below 60,000 but this was well up on 17,700 from mid 2008.

The HLFS shows that there are 150,000 unemployed, 122,100 workers wanting to work more hours and a total of 254,000 people who are jobless once those discouraged from seeking work are added to the figures.

Māori unemployment is at 14.2 percent, Pacific people at 12.3 percent and youth unemployment (15-19 years) is at 25.1 percent.

“For all the talk that the recession is over, this shows that unemployed workers are continuing to bear the brunt of a recession caused by the global financial crisis.”

“More needs to be done to assist these workers.”

ENDS

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