Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Robbie Whyte: Questioning the Ethics of Abstraction

Robbie Whyte: Questioning the Ethics of Abstraction

19 August, 2014

Normally when you attend an art gallery you expect to see art already lining the walls.

For Robbie Whyte’s first solo exhibition, Abstract / Ethics, alongside his own work he intends to fill 12 empty frames in collaboration with visitors to Toi Pōneke Gallery at a workshop following the opening night, Monday 1 September.

Robbie’s own drawings take four to eight hours to complete in one sitting. “It’s a process that forces me into a meditative space. They take a long time and a lot of testing to get right, and I am always proud of what I’ve created.”

On opening night Robbie intends to introduce gallery visitors to this process but break it down into a much shorter timeframe, providing the opportunity to be involved in the production of one of the large-scale wall drawings.

Visitors to the workshop and artist’s talk will be able to talk with Robbie about all things art and his own work as well as produce work to be shown inside the gallery. There is an instructional drawing book that visitors can download or read, or they can make their own work at the drawing desk that sits in the gallery.

In his fourth year of a Bachelor of Fine Arts at Massey University, and at the age of 21, Robbie is very much engaged with the academic side of art but believes that everyone should be able to access the conversation around art's importance and function in society.

“So much of art is locked up in essays and talks which surround the work, and on top of that, years and years of art education. I want people to be able to access my art and the conversation it contains.”

From a young age Robbie was aware of the social, cultural and economic disparity he grew up in. It is this mindfulness that’s informed his work throughout his study and for this exhibition.

Hailing from a long line of wood-workers and boat-builders, and being raised on a small farm in Ngongotaha near Rotorua, Robbie had the freedom to create and experiment.

“Coming off a farm I had that instinctive Kiwi ingenuity and was able to refine those skills using the workshop at Massey.”

Robbie has made the frames for the art that will be created, the wooden compasses used to create the work and the table visitors can sit/stand at to produce their art.

Council Arts Advisor Jodie Dalgleish says, “Robbie has developed a body of instructional work that involves people, filling some of the silence around abstract art with their participation, engagement and conversations.”

In his final year of high school, Robbie won the Rotorua Wearable Creations ‘n Colour Awards and his prize was to travel to Europe and experience art and culture in some of the major cities. The highlight was the Venice Biennale where he saw Judy Millar’s work – an Auckland based artist – in Personal Structures.

Seeing the high level of importance placed on the arts in Europe, he realised that access to and investment in art as culture is limited in New Zealand. “We need to value art more highly but to achieve that it needs to be integrated fully into our society.”

The opening of Abstract / Ethics is at 5.30pm, Thursday 28 August at Toi Pōneke Gallery, 61 Abel Smith Street, and it runs until 20 September. To sign up for the workshop, Monday 1 September you can phone 385 1929 or email drawing.book.14@gmail.com, places are limited.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Culture: Rare Hundertwasser Conservation Posters Found After 40 Years

When Jan and Arnold Heine put a roll of conservation posters into storage in 1974 they had no idea that 42 years later they would be collectors items. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: The Stolen Island: Searching for ‘Ata by Scott Hamilton

Reviewed by Michael Horowitz
Located even further south than temperate Noumea, Tonga’s tiny island of ‘Ata might have become the jewel of the kingdom’s burgeoning tourist industry. Imagine a Tongan resort that would not only be mild in winter, but pleasant in summer. More>>

Reviewed by Michael Horowitz
Located even further south than temperate Noumea, Tonga’s tiny island of ‘Ata might have become the jewel of the kingdom’s burgeoning tourist industry. Imagine a Tongan resort that would not only be mild in winter, but pleasant in summer. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: No Pretence. No Bullshit. Fine Poem.

John Dickson doesn’t publish much; never has. Indeed, this new collection is his first such in 18 years. As he wryly and dryly states,

I’ve published two slim volumes, and spent all
My time working on the next.
(from Wasp p.67) More>>

Scoop Review of Books: Extraordinary Anywhere: Essays On Place From Aotearoa NZ

The New Zealand landscape undoubtedly is very beautiful, but so is the British one, and my attachment to this country is much more about some particular places, and the memories and emotions that in them combine, than it is about the landscape as a whole. More>>

Canonisation Fodder: Suzanne Aubert Declared ‘Venerable’

Suzanne Aubert, the founder of the Sisters of Compassion New Zealand’s home grown order of Sisters, has been declared ‘venerable’, a major milestone on the path to sainthood in the Catholic Church. More>>

“I Have Not Performed Well Enough”: Ernie Merrick Leaving Wellington Phoenix

Ernie Merrick has stepped down from his position as Wellington Phoenix FC Head Coach. The club would like to thank Ernie for his contribution to Wellington Phoenix and wish him all the best in his future endeavours. More>>

Ray Columbus: NZ Music Icon Passes Away

60s New Zealand music Icon Ray Columbus has passed away peacefully at his home north of Auckland... Ray Columbus enjoyed more than three decades at the top of NZ entertainment as a singer, songwriter, bandleader, music manager and TV star. More>>

Review: Bernard Herrmann's Scores For 'Vertigo' & 'Psycho'

Howard Davis: The NZSO's adventurousness was richly-rewarded, as the deeply appreciative Wellington audience was given the opportunity not only to see a couple of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest films, but also to hear fine renditions of two of Bernard Herrmann's most accomplished film scores. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news