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On Q+A and Sunday this weekend - 28th August

On Q+A and Sunday this weekend - 28th August


On Q+A this week: The Spirit Level has been one of the most influential political books of the past decade, even if strictly speaking it's not about politics. Its thesis: That the gap between rich and poor is making us sicker, sadder and more violent. So with inequality set to become a major election issue, we speak to the author of The Spirit Level, Prof. Richard Wilkinson. Will reducing inequality reduce our other social problems? Or is it more complicated than that? And does such intervention risk stifling entrepreneurship, creativity and individual freedoms?

Then, tens of thousands of tourists will touchdown in New Zealand over the next few weeks, expecting a 100% pure experience. What will they make of our polluted lakes and rivers? Is the farming that drives our economy now putting our prosperity in jeopardy? Is it time to ask more of our farmers? We'll debate the issue with Federated Farmers President Bruce Wills and Environmental Scientist Mike Joy.

On the panel this week, Political Analyst Dr Claire Robinson is joined by Chief Executive of the Waipareira Trust and former Cabinet minister John Tamihere and Business New Zealand CEO Phil O'Reilly.

Q+A, 9-10am Sundays on TV ONE. Repeats at 9.10pm Sundays, 10.10am and 2.10pm Mondays on TVNZ 7

On Sunday

7:30pm Sundays on TV ONE

MOTHERS' DARLINGS

They were the love-children of the GIs, illegitimate kids born to American soldiers who swept through the Pacific fighting a war, making friends and finding love. When the war was over the soldiers went home and their babies stayed. Fatherless. Like Arthur Beren. His dad was a GI who helped build the airstrip on Aitutaki, his mother a beautiful young Cook Islander. Arthur was brought up believing his father was dead, while thousands of kilometres away in Flint Michigan a father grieved for his son and for the next 60 years they would remain separated by circumstances. This is a story of war, intimacy, broken hearts an in the end ...connection.

WOW

"STEP INTO A WORLD WHERE ART AND THE HUMAN FORM COMBINE, WHERE DANCE, MUSIC AND LIGHTING TELL A STORY OF THE BODY AS A CANVAS; WHERE THE LINES OF FASHION AND ART BLUR AND MERGE AS ONE..." - WORLD OF WEARABLE ART (WOW)

But this year, for the first time, TV cameras are allowed behind the scenes at this fanciful festival and they are SUNDAY cameras.

It's a magic time, a magic insight.

NO CASE TO ANSWER

We were absorbed by the case - two light bulbs, a light fitting, nine court appearances, endless hours of investigation and court time only for the charges to be withdrawn. No case to answer for Cornelius Arie Smith Voorkamp, the young Aspergers sufferer painted as a looter after the Christchurch earthquake. So why did police persist with the charges for so long and why did they put this young man through the ordeal. They explain to SUNDAY.

ends

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