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Food Prices Keep Crushing Kiwis

Rising food prices are continuing to slam Kiwi budgets, National’s Finance spokesperson Nicola Willis says.

“Data released by Statistics New Zealand today show that food prices have increased by an average of 8.3 per cent in the last 12 months, which included a 16 per cent increase in the price of fruit and vegetables.

“It’s impossible to get ahead under Labour. Food is up, rent is up, and petrol is up. With wage growth lagging inflation so significantly, it’s no surprise that Kiwis are getting pummelled.

“Basic produce has soared in the last year. Broccoli up 44 per cent. Cauliflower up 53 per cent. Kiwifruit up 42 per cent. Onions up 40 per cent. The Government keeps blaming events overseas for runaway inflation, but the prices of food grown at home are skyrocketing.

“The obvious cause is widespread labour shortages. Bottlenecks in the economy, like the Government’s failed immigration settings, are constraining growth and driving prices up higher.

“Kiwis finally deserve a real economic plan, not just more spending.

“The failed Cost of Living Payment just poured more cash into the economy, lighting a fire under inflation and leaving many Kiwis worse off overall.

“National is absolutely committed to reining in inflation. We’ll eliminate bottlenecks to growth, stop wasteful spending and adjust tax brackets for inflation.”

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